Waterman Carene . . .

Waterman Carene

Waterman “Carene” fountain pen is an elegant and classy pen making me feel as if I’m composing an epic tome. The Carene is a deep black luminescent lacquer finish barrel with electroplated palladium trim with a shape inspired by the streamlined symmetry of the world’s finest yachts. The french translation of “carène” is “hull”. This quality fountain pen features a highly lacquered barrel and extremely smooth in-laid rhodium-plated 18k solid gold extra fine nib. Heavy weight (brass base), yet ergonomically balanced for writing comfort. The pen can be fitted with a Waterman cartridge or a Waterman converter for use with bottled ink. The timeless designed Waterman “Carene” fountain pen is made in France.

Note: I’m currently hand-writing the first draft of growing into my skin with my Carene, filled with Waterman Mysterious Blue bottled fountain pen ink on 8.5 x 11.75 canary yellow legal pads.

Pilot Metropolitan . . .

Pilot Metro
Another of my fountain pens: The Pilot Metropolitan (a modern Japanese manufactured pen), black sleek, smooth-shaped pen great for everyday use. This pen features a stylish matte finish with a glossy middle band. The brass cap and barrel give the pen a comfortable weight and balance. Combined with its smooth-writing Extra Fine stainless steel nib, this makes the Metropolitan a pen that is well-loved by fountain pen novices and expert users alike. The pen uses an ink cartridge or an aerometric (squeeze) converter, I have opted to use a Pilot Con-50 converter which has a greater ink capacity. Currently it is not inked, I prefer filling with Waterman Brown fountain pen ink, which makes for a great letter writer and complements my cream Original Crown Mill 100% Cotton stationary. (Pilot Worldwide distributes the same fountain pen in the UK market under the name: Pilot “MR” Fountain Pen)

Hero 616 . . .

hero616
Here is another of my go-to pens, the Hero 616 in black plastic and chrome metal is a Chinese manufactured fountain pen which pays homage to the great Parker 51 model fountain pen. The pen is well copied in detail even down to the Parker arrow clip and the steel “jewel” crowned cap. The thin metal cap is etched with separated groupings of 7 pinstripes and has the Chinese characters for “Hero” and the model number “616”.

Once the slip cap is removed, the clutch ring at the join of the barrel and hood is displayed. However, unlike the all-metal ring of the original 51, the Hero ring serves as a small ink-view window, enabling one to see if there’s ink left in the reservoir (a feature that would have been convenient on the Parker 51).

Unscrewing the barrel reveals the pump-style filler similar to the aerometric filler of the original Parker 51 for use with bottled ink. The pen holds a surprising amount of ink and is a smooth writer for such an inexpensive pen. It’s lighter in weight than my Parker 51, yet both pens are comfortable writers. I have the Hero 616 filled with Sheaffer Purple fountain pen ink and use it regularly for general writing.

F.P.R. Indus Demonstrator . . .

  FPR_Indus
This is the first refillable fountain pen that sent me on the road to collecting and using fountain pens: The Fountain Pen Revolution (F.P.R.) Indus Clear Demo with gold-tone accents. This is not an expensive pen by any means, it’s made in India exclusively for F.P.R., an Indian fountain pen distributor located in Arkansas, USA. The Indus is a clear demonstrator made entirely of transparent plastic except for the gold-toned metal clip, ring and stainless steel Extra Fine nib. It’s a piston-filler which is filled with ink by twisting a knob on the end of the pen which draws the ink into the ink reservoir. The Indus is lightweight and comfortable in the hand. I keep my Indus inked with Waterman Serenity Blue fountain pen ink and it’s always within easy reach on my desk. For a basic no-frills pen, the clear Indus Demonstrator is just a fun pen to use. I enjoy watching the ink slosh around inside and being that it’s clear, I can observe its internal working parts.

Pilot Varsity . . .

Pilot Varsity

My very first fountain pen: the Pilot Varsity disposable fountain pen captures the fun of writing with a fountain pen in a modern plastic body style. It’s medium stainless steel nib and Advanced Liquid Ink Feed System provide a smooth writing experience, and the black ink supply is visible through a window on the side. The Varsity is a great no-maintenance everyday fountain pen, when the ink runs out, simply toss the pen in the trash. However, fountain pen enthusiasts have devised a way to refill the pen, if one is so inclined. An extremely inexpensive fountain pen that writes like a pen priced many times the $2.95 price tag.

egads! I’ve become a penophile . . .

 

 

fountain poen

Yes, I’m a fountain pen addict, it all started in April 2015 when I purchased my first fountain pen. I fell in love with the little boogers and began collecting and using fountain pens, both vintage & contemporary. As of to-date, my collection exceeds 200 vintage and contemporary fountain pens as well as a few dip pens and an assortment of vintage and contemporary ink pen paraphernalia. My ink collection consists of mostly traditional inks (Parker, Waterman, Chesterfield, Sheaffer and Levenger) as these inks are compatible with vintage pens. I steer away from “boutique” inks as they can damage the earlier manufactured fountain pens. I do have one black De Atramentis document ink (waterproof and archive ink) and a bottle of Noodler’s Black (also waterproof), both are used only in contemporary fountain pens.

There are two types of Fountain Pen collectors: (1) the collector, who collects but does not use the pens. This individual acquires and trades mostly unused fountain pens and has little or no interest in using the pen. (2) the other collector is the individual who acquires and uses his/her fountain pens. I am a collector/user, I enjoy the experience of writing with different models/makes of fountain pens.